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Drink Up! Coffee Drinkers Live Longer, Study Says [Study]

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Coffee, coffee, coffee — the ubiquitous lifeblood of work forces everywhere.

For decades conventional wisdom taught us that the caffeinated, brown, super fuel was harmful to human health. It was undeniably linked to increased blood pressure and heart disease, yet people still drank away, mainly because there was no other choice for America’s sleep-deprived society.

Talk about an addiction.

Last month the New England Journal of Medicine published the single largest study  EVER DONE on the health effects of coffee, which followed more than 402,000 coffee drinkers over a 13 year span.¹

The results? AWESOME, and somewhat shocking.

NEJM’s research found that coffee consumption was directly linked to a decreased risk of death, specifically from heart disease, respiratory disease, stroke, injuries and accidents, diabetes and infections.

What’s more — the risk of death significantly decreased  as the number of cups per day increased. The table below breaks down the decreased risk of death per cup of coffee, with the sweet spot landing somewhere between 2-6 cups/day.

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While it’s unclear if caffeine is the major supernutrient present in coffee (coffee has over 1,000 compounds, many of which are extremely potent antioxidants) one thing is, your coffee habit is no longer an addition — it’s a healthy ritual.

 


 


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Works Cited

1. Freedman, Neal D., Yikyung Park, Christian Abnet, Albert Hollenbeck, and Rashmi Sinha. “Association of Coffee Drinking with Total and Cause-Specific Mortality.” The New England Journal of Medicine 1904th ser. 366.1891 (2012): n. pag. The New England Journal of Medicine. The New England Journal of Medicine, 17 May 2012. Web. 14 June 2012.

Bryan DiSanto

Bryan DiSanto

Founder & Editor-in-Chief at Lean It UP
ELLO ELLO I'm Bryan DiSanto. I'm the Founder & Editor-in-Chief of Lean It UP, a CPT/CSN/Fitness Coach, Chef trained at Le Cordon Bleu – Paris, NYU graduate, ex-fat kid, and all-around fitness junkie.

I also contribute to Men's Health Magazine.

When I'm not working on my abs (or somebody else’s), whipping up avocado roses and avocado toast, or running a Tough Mudder, I'm probably yelling at a Carolina Panthers game somewhere.

Come be friends with me on Instagram (@BRYDISANTO) & Snapchat (BRYDISANTO).
Bryan DiSanto
  • mourafc

    @fbigao pois é, gostei muito do estudo tbm. Agora só preciso reduzir 2 copos para ganhar o máximo de benefícios.

    • fbigao

      @mourafc nossa! 🙂