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18 Reasons Why You NEED To Lift Weights, Especially If You’re a Woman

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Before I get into the benefits of weight lifting, I need to send a message to women: weight lifting is NOT just for guys!

The belief that weight-lifting will get women super-jacked, ripped, and masculine is completely ridiculous and flat-out wrong.

The only ways for women to build significant amounts of muscle–to the point where they start looking manly — are to:

  1. take steroids
  2. take HGH, testosterone, or other hormones
  3. have abnormally high levels of natural testosterone, which is extremely rare and you’d be aware of it (it’s not healthy for women)

For 99.9% of women none of these apply–which basically means that you have zero excuse not to lift weights (you’ll tone up and nothing more, I promise).

Jamie Eason (above) is pretty much as jacked as a women can get naturally, and I honestly think she looks fantastic and VERY feminine. I hope this article can convince more women to start lifting, because those who don’t are missing out on so many awesome benefits (which I’ll get to in a minute).

 

18 Powerful Benefits of Weight Lifting


Strength training, resistance training, weight lifting, etc. are not just about building bigger muscles. Sure, one popular goal is to grow size-wise, but the majority of people who train religiously acknowledge that the benefits go far beyond muscular growth. Here are 18 reasons why you NEED to lift weights, right now.

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1. It builds muscle and burns fat — that equates to a LEAN body.

With enough time and training, muscle growth eventually converts into visible muscle tone and definition. Higher intensity lifting and metabolic training also stimulate lipolysis (fat breakdown and release) and increase the body’s metabolism long after training is finished. Besides the calories burned during your session, you’ll continue to torch elevated calories for a prolonged window afterwards.

And what else could you want? Aesthetics and looking great naked are one of the driving forces behind why most people strength train. Society weighs appearance so heavily, which makes it vital to look your best. It also produces self-confidence. Not only that, but a muscular, lean, toned body screams health and strength. A healthy, strong person is an attractive person that people gravitate towards.

Apparently “attractive” people make 3-4% more money on average than those with below-average looks. Well, well, look at that.

 

2. It burns a ton of calories and boosts BMR.

A high-intensity weight lifting session can burn up to 500 calories per hour. Weight lifting has also been scientifically proven to boost BMR (basal metabolic rate) for up to 24 hours post-workout.

Not only are you burning calories in the gym, but also afterward when you’re on the couch relaxing. The more intense the workout, the more calories you’ll burn post-workout via boosted metabolism.

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3. Muscle burns more calories at rest than fat.

More muscle = higher resting metabolism. More muscle and less fat means that you’ll burn more calories at work, on the couch, and while you’re sleeping. Muscle tone helps you get lean, look lean, and stay lean.

 

4. Muscle is functional.

Having more muscle means you’re stronger and fitter, which translates into better functional performance in everyday life. You’ll look A LOT better when you’re the only friend that can carry a heavy TV up a flight of stairs. It’ll at least get you a free beer, and maybe a date.



 

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Bryan DiSanto

Bryan DiSanto

Founder & Editor-in-Chief at Lean It UP
ELLO ELLO I'm Bryan DiSanto. I'm the Founder & Editor-in-Chief of Lean It UP, a CPT/CSN/Fitness Coach, Chef trained at Le Cordon Bleu – Paris, NYU graduate, ex-fat kid, and all-around fitness junkie.

I also contribute to Men's Health Magazine.

When I'm not working on my abs (or somebody else’s), whipping up avocado roses and avocado toast, or running a Tough Mudder, I'm probably yelling at a Carolina Panthers game somewhere.

Come be friends with me on Snapchat (BRYDISANTO).
Bryan DiSanto

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  • Al

    I like the information you provide, but the fact that you have to open 9 different pages just to read a single article is kind of annoying and incredibly cumbersome. You should find a more seamless format for your readers ease (…like put all the information on one page). I’d probably read your articles religiously if the reading format wasn’t such a nuisance, but I pretty much never get past page 2 before I give up entirely.

    • Point taken, and noted.

      Thanks for your feedback — we broke up a lot of the older content (I’ll admit 9 is a little bit absurd, it was more a format test to see if it’d take), but most people had the same concerns as you, so in the past few months I’ve only split really long articles/when separate topics merit their own page.

      Thanks again Al!

      • Olly Stabler

        You can’t lose fat and build muscle at the same time with a non cardio exercise. Get your facts right!!!!

        • Says who? Undoubtedly it’s a slower process (vs. a pure bulk up or weight loss cycle), but if your training is on point (and your diet supports it) you can absolutely see visible gains in muscle mass paired with fat loss.

          Beginner’s, especially, typically see muscle gain and fat loss occur in concert.

          • Olly Stabler

            Says science? Go read some books.

            • Just because something’s challenging and calculated, doesn’t mean it’s impossible.

              Yes it’s hard, but when you optimize res. training with diet, cardio, and supplements, it starts to come together — I’ve done it with myself and plenty of clients.

              Body composition goes WAY beyond calories in vs. calories out.

    • Halved everything for you, too.