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18 Reasons Why You NEED To Lift Weights, Especially If You’re a Woman

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5. EPOC.

EPOC stands for excess post-exercise oxygen consumption — the increased rate of oxygen consumption following intense exercise.

Translated — your body burns more calories naturally after you lift weights.

Basically, EPOC causes the body to increase its consumption of fuel, in this case the body’s fuel is fat. In response to exercise, fat stores break down, free fatty acids (FFA) release into the bloodstream, and then are burned off. That’s a very, very good thing.

 

6. Prevents the metabolic decline that comes with age.

Weight lifting can reverse the natural decline in your metabolism, which begins around age 30. Keeping your metabolism elevated for as long as possible will help keep you in top shape and let you eat like a teenager.

 

7. Bone strength.

Weight training does more than strengthen your muscles, it also strengthens your bones. Regular weight lifting increases bone density, which reduces the risk of fracture and osteoporosis.

Studies show that adults over the age 80 who do weight-bearing programs can significantly increase bone density. Exercise truly is a lifelong activity.

KEY FOR WOMEN: Osteoporosis is MUCH MORE common in women than in men, primarily due to the hormonal cycle (and probably because women don’t weight train like they should!). In fact, women are four times more likely than men to develop and suffer from osteoporosis, and can lose up to 20% of their bone mass during the first five-seven years following menopause.

 

8. Improves posture.

A stronger back, shoulders, neck, and core can help you stand up straight and look confident. Plus you’ll look taller. Better posture also preserves the spine and reduces lower back pain.



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Bryan DiSanto

Bryan DiSanto

Founder & Editor-in-Chief at Lean It UP
ELLO ELLO I'm Bryan DiSanto. I'm the Founder & Editor-in-Chief of Lean It UP, a CPT/CSN/Fitness Coach, Chef trained at Le Cordon Bleu – Paris, NYU graduate, ex-fat kid, and all-around fitness junkie.

I also contribute to Men's Health Magazine.

When I'm not working on my abs (or somebody else’s), whipping up avocado roses and avocado toast, or running a Tough Mudder, I'm probably yelling at a Carolina Panthers game somewhere.

Come be friends with me on Instagram (@BRYDISANTO) & Snapchat (BRYDISANTO).
Bryan DiSanto

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